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Rocket Women Featured By She The People

3 February, 2019
Rocket Women Featured In She The People TV

Rocket Women Featured In She The People TV

Rocket Women are honoured to be featured by She The People.TV! She The People.TV are India’s first women’s channel inspired by real stories and aim to change the discourse for women.

There has always been a dearth of women in the field of science despite their phenomenal talent. Vinita Marwaha Madill, an advocate for women in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math), aims to not only work towards broadening this “acceptance”, but also to encourage young girls to realise their true passion and build on it.

Having grown up in the United Kingdom, the Indian-origin woman is currently based at the European Space Agency (ESA) where she is working on future human spaceflight projects as a Space Operations Engineer. Vinita has also been involved in spacesuit design for ESA. Alongside holding several designations, Vinita, who is in her early-30s, has also started a platform, Rocket Women, to inspire women around the world and provide advice on working in the space and technology industries.

Read the full interview here at She The People.TV or the highlights below:

How did the idea of Rocket Women apparel line come up?

I noticed that over the years, the number of women that progressed with me to ultimately choose a career in engineering decreased, something which is called the ‘leaky pipeline’ syndrome. Only 15 per cent of UK engineering graduates are female, with the number of women ultimately choosing engineering decreasing further. In India, India Institutes of Technology (IITs) are reserving 14 per cent of the seats for women, aiming to encourage more women to apply in future.

Encouraging more girls to pursue engineering will help to fill this gap, ensuring that they make up 50 per cent of engineering talent and that we’re not missing out on the talent available. The Rocket Women apparel collection was born from a desire to make a difference.

Proceeds from Rocket Women clothing will support a scholarship for young women who choose to study engineering and science. Representation matters and scholarships play a pivotal role in encouraging diverse talented individuals to pursue opportunities in STEM that may have not have had that chance otherwise.

Without the fortuity of scholarships myself, I would have never had been able to complete my studies internationally and to reach my goals in the space industry. With Rocket Women, we want to empower women with our apparel and messaging to become Rocket Women, whilst also building opportunities for future young women through proceeds supporting a scholarship

How will Rocket Women inspire young girls and women to understand their passion and pursue it?

My passion, and the goal of my website Rocket Women is to inspire girls globally to consider a career in STEM. Outside of my career path in space, I realised there was something more. With Rocket Women, we’re focusing on outreach and I’ve been lucky to be involved in projects, including a campaign and round table with Instagram and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, highlighting the importance of education.

During my career, I’ve met some amazing people — especially other positive female role models. I think you need those role models out there, tangible and visible, to be able to inspire the next generation of young girls to become astronauts, or be whatever they want to be. As Sally Ride, the first American woman in space, said, “You can’t be what you can’t see.” It’s one of my favourite quotes and is absolutely true.

I started Rocket Women to give these women a voice and a platform to spread their advice. I’m interviewing women around the world in STEM, particularly in space, and posting the interviews on Rocket Women, along with advice to encourage girls to be involved in STEM.

By featuring stories of women in STEM, we want Rocket-Women.com to give young women and girls the realisation that they can be astronauts or whatever they want to be. Our aim is to empower young women to choose a career in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Maths) and achieve their dreams, so that we can improve the current percentage of female engineering talent.

We’re driven at Rocket Women by this powerful thought – Imagine what the world would look like if it reached 100% of its technological potential?

Read the full She The People.TV article here!

Media

Rocket Women Featured In IDEAxME!

31 March, 2016

I’m honoured to be interviewed by IDEAxME! in their recent feature titled, “The Future Astronaut Who Wants To Use The Power of Successful Women In Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths To Inspire Girls.”

“IDEAxME! interviews Vinita Marwaha Madill.

Vinita is a STEM advocate and founder of Rocket Women. She is currently working as an independent consultant, focusing on space engineering and STEM outreach, having previously consulted for ESA’s Space Medicine Office on a Gravity Loading Countermeasure Skinsuit (GLCS) for astronauts and will one day no doubt achieve her objective of becoming an astronaut!

IDEAxME! asked her about her human story, how she came to study at the International Space University and work on big ideas which our shaping our world.”

Listen to the feature above or here.

Inspirational women, Media

Inspiring Women To Reach For The Stars In Silicon Republic

10 March, 2016

Vinita Marwaha Madill at the at DLR (German Aerospace Centre) in Cologne, Germany, working on ISS Operations

Vinita Marwaha Madill at the at DLR (German Aerospace Centre) in Cologne, Germany, working on ISS Operations [Silicon Republic]

Rocket Women is honoured to be featured by Ireland’s biggest science and technology news website, Silicon Republic. The article is part of their ‘Women Invent’ series, which highlights and profiles women in STEM, aiming to encourage young women to be more aware of STEM and pursue careers in it.

Here’s an excerpt from the article in which I discuss the importance of encouraging girls to consider a career in STEM, my reasoning behind starting Rocket Women and the path to achieving my goals in the space industry:

The sky is no limit for space consultant Vinita Marwaha Madill, who is keen for young women interested in STEM to have role models.

‘In space, no-one can hear your bones weaken, but some exercise and a specially-designed spacesuit can help – and this is where space engineering consultant Vinita Marwaha Madill comes in.

“Astronauts carrying out six-month missions on the International Space Station [ISS], including Tim Peake, can grow up to 5cm to 7cm in height, with the spinal growth causing tension in the vertebrae and back pain,” explains Marwaha, adding that, in microgravity, humans can lose 1-2pc of their bone mass per month and their muscles can waste.

Exercise can help protect against these changes, but what else can be done? Marwaha has been involved in designing a ‘gravity-loading countermeasure skinsuit’ with the European Space Agency to mimic the effects of gravity on the body and help prevent elongation of the spine.

The suit, which draws on several years of research and development, was evaluated last year onboard the ISS by Danish ESA astronaut Andreas Mogensen.

“With a force close to that felt on Earth, the suit effectively squeezes an astronaut’s body gradually in hundreds of stages from the shoulders to the feet,” explains Marwaha. “The suit could also be used alongside current exercise countermeasures on the ISS to help prevent bone loss. Bone responds to loading and the suit’s pressure on the skeleton could help to stimulate bone growth.”

Vinita Marwaha  Madill installing and developing the astronaut procedures for EML (Electromagnetic Levitator) using the training model at the European Astronaut Centre

Vinita Marwaha Madill installing and developing the astronaut procedures for EML (Electromagnetic Levitator) using the training model at the European Astronaut Centre [Silicon Republic]

Marwaha Madill has also helped astronauts to get to grips with spacewalk (EVA) skills at the European Space Agency’s European Astronaut Centre (EAC) in Cologne, Germany.

“The astronauts train to carry out EVA,s or spacewalks, underwater,” she explains, because training underwater provides a microgravity-type experience. “Astronauts initially learned how to translate, or move along, the Station using its handrails, move in the spacesuit and operate tools, before eventually moving on to training for full-length spacewalks.”

Currently based in the UK and Canada, Marwaha has worked too on ISS operations at the German Aerospace Centre (DLR), guiding and training astronauts through experiments on the Station as it orbits Earth.

Marwaha credits role models such as astronauts Helen Sharman and Sally Ride for inspiring her to work in the space sector.

Aged 12, Marwaha went to the library and printed the astronaut candidate guidelines (you can see a contemporary version here) from NASA’s website, then stuck them to the inside cover of her school folder. She recalls them as being a daily reminder of how to reach her goal and set her focus on achieving them. “Those guidelines set the direction for my career,” she says.

Today, as well as working as a consultant focusing on space engineering, Marwaha is heavily involved in STEM Outreach through talks and through her website Rocket Women, for which she interviews women in STEM and space around the world.

“Only 6pc of the UK engineering workforce are female, meaning that UK companies are missing out on almost 50pc of their engineering talent. This is coupled with the fact that girls make up under 20pc of students taking physics A-level,” she says.

“My passion, and the goal of my website Rocket Women, is to try and reverse this trend by inspiring girls globally to consider a career in STEM. I think you need those role models out there, tangible and visible, to be able to inspire the next generation of young girls to become astronauts, or be whatever they want to be. I started Rocket Women to give these women a voice and a platform to spread their advice.”

Read the full Silicon Republic article here.

Media

Rocket Women Featured in Leonard David’s Inside Outer Space

21 January, 2016
My Image Motto: Dress For The Job You Want, Not The One You Have

My Image Motto: Dress For The Job You Want, Not The One You Have – Featured on Inside Outer Space

A big thank you to Leonard David for his glowing write up of Rocket Women on his Inside Outer Space website. The article states:

“If you’re a woman looking for inspiration to pursue a career in the space and technology industries, take a look at the Rocket Women website.

The site provides a platform through which women interested in the space and technology industries can gain information about a career and have questions answered.

“My mission is to inspire women around the world and provide advice on working in the space and technology industries,” explains Vinita Marwaha Madill.

Madill has founded Rocket Women. Its aim is to inspire women to study Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) and use those skills to consider a career in the space industry.”

Read the full story here.