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Media, Partnerships

Rocket Women Honoured To Be Featured in Stylist Magazine

17 October, 2019
Rocket Women Founder Vinita Marwaha Madill represents Rocket Women in Stylist Magazine x Specsavers feature (Image Copyright: Stylist Magazine)

Rocket Women Founder Vinita Marwaha Madill represents Rocket Women in Stylist Magazine x Specsavers feature (Image Copyright: Stylist Magazine 2019 https://www.stylist.co.uk/life/space-station-travel-female-engineer/277819)

Rocket Women are thrilled to be featured in Stylist Magazine! Stylist featured Rocket Women and Founder Vinita Marwaha Madill in two fantastic articles recently, including a feature on women in space and an article on space design in partnership with Specsavers UK.

An extract of the Stylist Magazine feature titled, “Three young women on reaching for the stars, and finding space“, from an interview with Vinita representing Rocket Women describes:

Do you think the industry is changing?

NASA and the global space industry are really looking forward. The recent 2017 astronaut class has five girls out of a total of 12 astronauts, with two astronauts selected at 29 years old. That’s close to 10 years between completing Year 13 at secondary school or sixth form, to being selected as an astronaut!

Why would you encourage other young women to consider a career in the space industry?

You can have an amazing impact on the world. And there are lots of different pathways to work in the space industry – through communications, marketing, human resources, graphic design, space policy and law to name a few.

Read the full feature and interview with Vinita here.

Rocket Women were also fortunate to be featured in a Stylist Magazine collaboration in partnership with Specsavers UK! We love that our fantastic Rocket Women tote bag was featured! Our logo and apparel are designed by the incredible female-run Marka Design. You can get your own tote here with all profits going towards a scholarship for women in science & engineering!


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👩🏽‍🚀 We’re so excited for @RocketWomen & Founder Vinita Marwaha Madill to be featured in @stylistmagazine discussing our mission to inspire & support the next generation! 🙌🏼 ▫️ #Repost @vmarwaha 🎉 So thrilled to share my interview with @StylistMagazine, discussing human spaceflight exploration & how we can inspire the next generation of @rocketwomen! (In partnership with @Specsavers) ▫️ 👩🏽‍🚀 “To ensure that we have equal talent, we need to inspire the next generation of young girls growing up to want to study science and engineering. There are all these amazing stories that inspired me, such as British astronaut Helen Sharman, but their stories weren’t being heard. I started a website called @rocketwomen, which made sure that these role models were tangible and visible to inspire the next generation. I was really inspired by a quote from the first American woman in space Sally Ride. She said, ‘You can’t be what you can’t see.’ I think that’s so very true.” ▫️ 👇🏽https://www.stylist.co.uk/life/space-station-travel-female-engineer/277819 ▫️ Video / Images: @stylistmagazine ▫️ 👜Tote bag: @rocketwomen by @marka_design 👗 Look: Dress by @FineryLondon, earrings by @thisiswhistles ▫️ 💄Hair & make-up: @amipenfold ▫️ #STEM #RocketWomen #Spon #Explore #SciComm #Inspo #instagood #photooftheday #instago #picoftheday #ootd #Exploration #Goals #aimhigh #DreamBig #Motivation #aimhigh #WomenInSTEM #EngineeringGals #Astronaut #GirlsInSTEM #WomenInScience #womenempoweringwomen #STEMinist #ironringgirls #womeninengineering #fashion #discoverunder1k #UK

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In the article, Vinita talks about Rocket Women‘s goals and the importance of space design & technology to our everyday lives on Earth.

“It’s about changing the world as well as space!

One thing people don’t hear about are the benefits that space technology has on Earth today. “In the 1980s, when NASA were developing new space suits, they were looking at different materials that would protect the astronauts (and manage body heat inside spacesuits) during space walks. They looked at something called ‘phase-change materials’, which help to maintain a current temperature for the astronauts while they’re in the spacesuit.

They didn’t use that in the spacesuit, but that technology was then used to develop incubators for premature babies. The incubators cost around $200 each and that’s 1% of the cost of a hospital incubator today. Those (Embrace) incubators have been used in 14 developing countries around the world and helped hundreds of thousands of premature babies.”

Rocket Women Founder Vinita Marwaha Madill featured in Stylist Magazine [Image copyright: Stylist Magazine https://www.stylist.co.uk/life/space-station-travel-female-engineer/277819]

Rocket Women Founder Vinita Marwaha Madill featured in Stylist Magazine x Specsavers feature, representing Rocket Women [Image copyright: Stylist Magazine https://www.stylist.co.uk/life/space-station-travel-female-engineer/277819]

Can you think of a way in which space technology helps you everyday? (Hint: GPS /Galileo in location mapping, every US banking transaction is timed by a GPS timing signal as are our electricity power supplies!).

As NASA said, space has elevated the human condition for all humanity. At Rocket Women, we’re excited to inspire the next generation to make an impact on the world through science & engineering!

Read the full Stylist Magazine interview and feature here!

Partnerships, Rocket Women Reflections

Rocket Women Reflections on the 2019 Women in Space Conference

18 May, 2019

By Bethany Downer

In February 2019 Scottsdale, Arizona hosted the Women in Space 2019 Conference (WIS) as an expansion of the Women in Planetary Science and Exploration 2018 conference. Rocket Women was also a proud partner of the event. The two-day event highlighted the achievements of women and non-binary researchers, while offering an opportunity to discuss, challenge, network, and support their peers. Rocket Women discussed the impact and reflections of the event with two attendees.

Emma Louden attended the 2019 Women in Space Conference in February 2019 in Scottsdale, Arizona. [Emma Louden]

Emma Louden attended the 2019 Women in Space Conference in February 2019 in Scottsdale, Arizona.
[Emma Louden]

Emma Louden is a junior at Princeton University majoring in Astrophysics and pursuing a minor in Planets and Life. She learned about WIS through the Brooke Owens Fellowship program and sought to share her research and to network with other attendees. When asked what the highlight experience of the event was for her, Emma explained the impact of meeting and hearing from other conference participants, which introduced her to a broader network of people to look up to who are “doing amazing science AND are committed to supporting women and non-binary scientists in the space industry.”

Luc Riesbeck attended the 2019 Women in Space Conference in February 2019 in Scottsdale, Arizona. They are pictured here with other conference attendees. [Luc Riesbeck]

Luc Riesbeck attended the 2019 Women in Space Conference in February 2019 in Scottsdale, Arizona. They are pictured here with other conference attendees. [Luc Riesbeck]

Luc Riesbeck is a master’s student at George Washington University’s Space Policy Institute and is interning with the Aerospace Corporation’s Center for Space Policy and Strategy in D.C during the Summer of 2019. As a non-binary person, Luc expressed that events and conferences geared towards diversity and inclusion in the industry can be “a little intimidating” due too possible misconceptions that diversity in STEM fields is “shorthand” for the inclusion of cis women, noting that cis women make up “just one part of a much larger picture of human diversity.” Fortunately, they noticed the dedication to this larger picture on the event’s website, which promoted a “holistic experience, organized by a team that respects the space industry’s potential for growth.”

The event delivered a wide variety of high quality presentations. Luc’s favourite moment from the conference was Dr. Julie Rathburn’s presentation on Loki, the most powerful volcano on Jupiter’s moon Io. They described the talk as “like watching Willy Wonka talk about the coolest candy ever made. Her energy and enthusiasm were beyond infectious; I left the talk feeling almost giddy with delight. I’ve never been more impressed with a technical presentation at a conference in my life, and I suspect I’ll probably never come across a better one”.

Her energy and enthusiasm were beyond infectious; I left the talk feeling almost giddy with delight. I’ve never been more impressed with a technical presentation at a conference in my life, and I suspect I’ll probably never come across a better one.

As the event sought to bring together individuals of various backgrounds to participate in the discussion, the event’s webpage stated “Supporting #WomenInSTEM is the prime goal” of the event. When asked how it feels to be in a room of individuals who came together to demonstrate their support for women in space, Luc expressed that it felt “spectacular” due to the wealth of perspectives from the attendees and the amount of quality ideas that emerged from the conference. “Suddenly we didn’t have to live in a bubble, hearing the same types of people that we have our whole careers—we could just choose to listen to voices we ordinarily wouldn’t.”

Suddenly we didn’t have to live in a bubble, hearing the same types of people that we have our whole careers—we could just choose to listen to voices we ordinarily wouldn’t.

Similarly, Emma expressed that when being in a room with like-minded support for #WomenInSTEM, “much of the toxic atmosphere present in male-centered academia evaporates. It is replaced by a feeling of support and belonging. There is a strong sense of community and identity that results in a level of comfort that is often lacking in other academic settings.”

When in a room with like-minded support for #WomenInSTEM, “much of the toxic atmosphere present in male-centered academia evaporates. It is replaced by a feeling of support and belonging. There is a strong sense of community and identity.”

It is clear that events like this have a meaningful impact not only on its participants, but also in the broader space industry. “Events like this signal that the future of the space industry is going to be more equitable and representative of the world because the people who attend conferences like Women in Space are working incredibly hard to make sure that reality comes into being,” shared Emma. “It shows a commitment to disrupting the status quo and moving toward a more inclusive space industry.”