Partnerships, Rocket Women Reflections

Rocket Women Reflections on the 2019 Women in Space Conference

18 May, 2019

By Bethany Downer

In February 2019 Scottsdale, Arizona hosted the Women in Space 2019 Conference (WIS) as an expansion of the Women in Planetary Science and Exploration 2018 conference. Rocket Women was also a proud partner of the event. The two-day event highlighted the achievements of women and non-binary researchers, while offering an opportunity to discuss, challenge, network, and support their peers. Rocket Women discussed the impact and reflections of the event with two attendees.

Emma Louden attended the 2019 Women in Space Conference in February 2019 in Scottsdale, Arizona. [Emma Louden]

Emma Louden attended the 2019 Women in Space Conference in February 2019 in Scottsdale, Arizona.
[Emma Louden]

Emma Louden is a junior at Princeton University majoring in Astrophysics and pursuing a minor in Planets and Life. She learned about WIS through the Brooke Owens Fellowship program and sought to share her research and to network with other attendees. When asked what the highlight experience of the event was for her, Emma explained the impact of meeting and hearing from other conference participants, which introduced her to a broader network of people to look up to who are “doing amazing science AND are committed to supporting women and non-binary scientists in the space industry.”

Luc Riesbeck attended the 2019 Women in Space Conference in February 2019 in Scottsdale, Arizona. They are pictured here with other conference attendees. [Luc Riesbeck]

Luc Riesbeck attended the 2019 Women in Space Conference in February 2019 in Scottsdale, Arizona. They are pictured here with other conference attendees. [Luc Riesbeck]

Luc Riesbeck is a master’s student at George Washington University’s Space Policy Institute and is interning with the Aerospace Corporation’s Center for Space Policy and Strategy in D.C during the Summer of 2019. As a non-binary person, Luc expressed that events and conferences geared towards diversity and inclusion in the industry can be “a little intimidating” due too possible misconceptions that diversity in STEM fields is “shorthand” for the inclusion of cis women, noting that cis women make up “just one part of a much larger picture of human diversity.” Fortunately, they noticed the dedication to this larger picture on the event’s website, which promoted a “holistic experience, organized by a team that respects the space industry’s potential for growth.”

The event delivered a wide variety of high quality presentations. Luc’s favourite moment from the conference was Dr. Julie Rathburn’s presentation on Loki, the most powerful volcano on Jupiter’s moon Io. They described the talk as “like watching Willy Wonka talk about the coolest candy ever made. Her energy and enthusiasm were beyond infectious; I left the talk feeling almost giddy with delight. I’ve never been more impressed with a technical presentation at a conference in my life, and I suspect I’ll probably never come across a better one”.

Her energy and enthusiasm were beyond infectious; I left the talk feeling almost giddy with delight. I’ve never been more impressed with a technical presentation at a conference in my life, and I suspect I’ll probably never come across a better one.

As the event sought to bring together individuals of various backgrounds to participate in the discussion, the event’s webpage stated “Supporting #WomenInSTEM is the prime goal” of the event. When asked how it feels to be in a room of individuals who came together to demonstrate their support for women in space, Luc expressed that it felt “spectacular” due to the wealth of perspectives from the attendees and the amount of quality ideas that emerged from the conference. “Suddenly we didn’t have to live in a bubble, hearing the same types of people that we have our whole careers—we could just choose to listen to voices we ordinarily wouldn’t.”

Suddenly we didn’t have to live in a bubble, hearing the same types of people that we have our whole careers—we could just choose to listen to voices we ordinarily wouldn’t.

Similarly, Emma expressed that when being in a room with like-minded support for #WomenInSTEM, “much of the toxic atmosphere present in male-centered academia evaporates. It is replaced by a feeling of support and belonging. There is a strong sense of community and identity that results in a level of comfort that is often lacking in other academic settings.”

When in a room with like-minded support for #WomenInSTEM, “much of the toxic atmosphere present in male-centered academia evaporates. It is replaced by a feeling of support and belonging. There is a strong sense of community and identity.”

It is clear that events like this have a meaningful impact not only on its participants, but also in the broader space industry. “Events like this signal that the future of the space industry is going to be more equitable and representative of the world because the people who attend conferences like Women in Space are working incredibly hard to make sure that reality comes into being,” shared Emma. “It shows a commitment to disrupting the status quo and moving toward a more inclusive space industry.”

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