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Science

Inspiration

New Scholarships For Women In STEM

26 November, 2015

Scholarship VG

Dreaming of being a pilor? This could be you! [Virgin Galactic]

If you or someone you know are looking to study an undergraduate degree in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Maths) then there are 2 scholarships that you should consider!

Cards Against Humanity – Science Ambassador Scholarship

The popular card game Cards Against Humanity are funding a full tuition scholarship for a woman seeking an undergraduate degree in science, engineering or maths. To apply submit a 3 minute video here of your awesome self explaining a science topic that your passionate about. The review panel will be is refreshingly ‘a board of fifty women who hold higher degrees and work professionally in science and engineering’ according to the Science Ambassador website. Once through this round, 10 finalists will submit additional materials for a chance at winning the scholarship and receive full tuition coverage for up to four years. Uniquely the scholarship is being funded through purchases of the Cards Against Humanity expansion Science Pack with the current total raised of US$546,724 and counting! The deadline to apply is December 1st, 2015. Good luck!

Virgin Galactic – Galactic Unite Flying Tigresses Scholarship

Virgin Galactic are providing a one-time scholarship award of $2,200 to a collegiate or early-career woman establishing a career in aerospace with a belief that ‘aviation and being a pilot is key to her career and personal mission’. In addition to the scholarship, the award recipient will have access to mentoring opportunities and other Galactic Unite educational programs in partnership with Virgin Galactic.

The origins of the Galactic Unite Flying Tigresses Scholarship began through Anne Marie Radel and Margaret Viola’s participation as “Team Flying Tigresses” in the 2015 Air Race Classic. An amazing all-women’s transcontinental air race stemming from the 1929 Women’s Air Derby. These inspirational women flew with the intention of raising awareness and support for women in STEM careers, women pilots, and the emerging commercial space industry. The deadline for the scholarship is November 30th, 2015 and can be applied for here.

Inspiration

1000 Female STEM Mentors Inspiring 1000 Girls

29 July, 2015
1000 GIRLS, 1000 FUTURES

1000 GIRLS, 1000 FUTURES

Who inspired you when you were younger? Your teacher? Your parents? If you’re a student, who inspires you now to make those difficult decisions about your future? 1000 girls in high schools around the world are about to get the chance to be inspired and ask their questions to 1000 women in STEM through the impactful 1000 Girls, 1000 Futures program,  an incredible new initiative from  the Global STEM Alliance (GSA). The GSA is ‘an international initiative of more than 90 partners and 50 countries—a collaboration of governments, corporations, educational institutions, and nongovernmental organizations—working together to assure the next the generation of STEM innovators’. The program is currently calling for female mentors in STEM fields GLOBALLY to sign up to the program, which will run from September 2015-September 2016. As having been a mentor myself for girls, I can tell you that it’s extremely rewarding and means a lot to each and every girl that you can impact, a reason why I started Rocket Women. Girls that sign up to the program will be able to directly contact a successful woman currently working in a STEM field to mentor them, along with an entire network of mentors and mentees globally!

If you’re a women working in a STEM field and would like to make a meaningful impact to the future of a girl, SIGN UP!

If you’re a girl considering a STEM career but don’t quite know how, SIGN UP!

Girls decide at the age of 11 to move away from sciences, making the work of this program critical to inspire these girls around the world. Essentially it’ll provide them with tangible female role models, allowing them to speak to someone who has already achieved career  success in their STEM field and understands that they’re make the hardest decisions in their education. The numbers speak for themselves. Only one in five UK A-level physics students are female, a figure that has not improved in 20 years. STEM subjects also accounted for 35% of the higher education qualifications achieved by women in 2010/11, a decrease since 2006. This program and others are increasingly important to show the next generation of girls that there is a bright and exciting future for them in science!

Inspirational women, Science Spotlight

The Untold Story of the New Horizons Mission Team

13 July, 2015

The Women Working on the New Horizons Mission.
Front from left to right: Amy Shira Teitel, Cindy Conrad, Sarah Hamilton, Allisa Earle, Leslie Young, Melissa Jones, Katie Bechtold, Becca Sepan, Kelsi Singer, Amanda Zangari, Coralie Jackman, Helen Hart. Standing, from left to right: Fran Bagenal, Ann Harch, Jillian Redfern, Tiffany Finley, Heather Elliot, Nicole Martin, Yanping Guo, Cathy Olkin, Valerie Mallder, Rayna Tedford, Silvia Protopapa, Martha Kusterer, Kim Ennico, Ann Verbiscer, Bonnie Buratti, Sarah Bucior, Veronica Bray, Emma Birath, Carly Howett, Alice Bowman. Not pictured: Priya Dharmavaram, Sarah Flanigan, Debi Rose, Sheila Zurvalec, Adriana Ocampo, Jo-Anne Kierzkowski. [NASA]

Tomorrow (July 14) at 7:49 am EDT we see a dwarf planet up-close for the first time, but behind this historic achievement is a team of brilliant, hard-working women. The New Horizons mission will fly-by Pluto tomorrow after travelling through the Solar System for over 9 years, allowing the world to learn about this icy dwarf planet during it’s 30,800 miles per hour (49,600 kilometers per hour) flyby. However the story that most people will not hear is of the mission team, with the flight team comprised by 25% women, potentially making it the NASA mission with highest number of women staffers, including many scientists and engineers. These women have dedicated their careers and years of their lives to this mission, to gain unique data from the seven instruments aboard New Horizons and gain an unprecedented insight into Pluto and it’s largest moon, Charon, in particular. The team are working to learn about their composition and the potential thin atmosphere that’s shared between them.

Alice Bowman, New Horizons Mission Operations Manager (MOM), On Console [Twitter]

Moreover Alice Bowman, New Horizons Mission Operations Manager (MOM) and group supervisor of the Space Department’s Space Mission Operations Group, made history as the first female Mission Operations Manager (MOM) at  Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL). When reading about the novel scientific discoveries gained by the instruments aboard New Horizons this week, make sure to remember the dedication of the women behind the mission.

Astronauts, Inspirational women

Inspirational Google Doodles Remember Sally Ride, The First American Woman In Space

26 May, 2015

One of Today’s Google Doodles Celebrating Sally Ride, the First American Woman In Space

Today’s Google doodles celebrate what would’ve been the 64th birthday of Sally Ride, the first American woman in space. Throughout her career at NASA Sally  informed major space policy decisions by being a presidential panel member of the 2009 Review of United States Human Spaceflight Plans Committee. This was an independent review of US Human Spaceflight Policy and resulted in fundamental changes made to the US space program. Sally Ride was a strong supporter of women’s education in science and engineering, co-founding Sally Ride Science, a science education company that creates entertaining science programs for 4-8th grade students, specifically focusing on girls and minority students.

Sally devoted her life to science and inspiring others to explore the wonders of STEM. Said in her own words, “Everywhere I go I meet girls and boys who want to be astronauts and explore space, or they love the ocean and want to be oceanographers, or they love animals and want to be zoologists, or they love designing things and want to be engineers. I want to see those same stars in their eyes in 10 years and know they are on their way!”

“Maybe her Doodle will motivate some girl or boy somewhere in the world to become a scientist and adventurer just like Sally.” – Tam O’Shaughnessy—life partner of astronaut Sally Ride, and co-founder & CEO of Sally Ride Science.

Today’s inspirational Google Doodles are below:

Google Doodle To Celebrate Sally Ride’s 64th Birthday

Google Doodle To Celebrate Sally Ride’s 64th Birthday

Google Doodle To Celebrate Sally Ride’s 64th Birthday

Google Doodle To Celebrate Sally Ride’s 64th Birthday

Inspiration

Girls Do Science Too

22 March, 2015

 

“I just think that inventing is for boys because they have Albert Einstein — he invented, he was a guy — and Benjamin Franklin also.”

A powerful new video “Girls Do Science” by Microsoft’s DigiGirlz campaign aspires to show why girls are lacking in STEM fields.

DigiGirlz gives high school girls the opportunity to learn about careers in technology, connect with Microsoft employees, and participate in hands-on computer and technology workshops. The video highlights that 7 out of 10 girls are interested at science when young, however only 2 out of 10 go on to work in STEM fields. The video shows the girls’ initial interest in science, with them excitedly describing the projects they’ve completed including designing a website and building a computer. However this initial excitement turns to doubt with the girls describing their reasons for shying away from science.

“There used to be a girl in the robotics class but she quit, so I’m the only girl left.”

“When I was littler I used to think technology was great, and then I started thinking it was more of a boys thing.” Without role models and peer support showing girls that they can study STEM and be great at science, girls hesitate to study subjects that have traditionally been described as “hard”. “In commercials I saw a lot more men doing it – they [girls] might like science but be afraid – thinking don’t girls do that, that’s a boy thing,” says one girl in the video, the result of a lack of prominent female STEM characters in media.

Women earn just 18 percent of computer science degrees in the U.S., a sector that has one of the highest average salaries of US $90,000, along with the smallest gender related pay gap (6.6%). This emphasises the need to inspire girls to continue their interest in STEM through to further education and a career.  The DigiGirlz video ends on a positive note with the girls receiving letters from Microsoft encouraging them to continue their science projects and to think about what they could achieve one day in the future. It’s certainly a step in the right direction, highlighting the issues preventing girls from entering STEM fields and providing support to allow them to build upon their passions and consider a gratifying career in science.