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Sarah Cruddas

Inspirational women, Meet A Rocket Woman

Meet A Rocket Woman: Sarah Cruddas, Space Journalist, Broadcaster & Author

20 August, 2017
Sarah Cruddas with SpaceShipOne, the spaceplane that won the Ansari X Prize

Sarah Cruddas with SpaceShipOne, the spaceplane that won the Ansari X Prize

Sarah Cruddas has been passionate about space since she was young. With a background in astrophysics and experience as a Weather Presenter and Science Correspondent for the BBC, Sarah now aims to communicate her advocacy for space to the public. Sarah is the face of space on British TV, featured on channels including Sky News, ITV, Channel 4 and the BBC, along with National Geographic and the Discovery Channel in the US. Sarah is also an author and recently published her first children’s book ‘Find Out! Solar System’ [Solar System (DKfindout!)], with her second book, ‘Did You Know? Space: Amazing Answers to More than 200 Awesome Questions!‘ to be released next month! She talks to Rocket Women about her journey in the space industry and how she was inspired to communicate the importance of space exploration.

Tell me about your journey to the space industry and to where you are now? 

I cannot remember a time when space was not my passion. From looking up at the Moon as a child, to learning about the Apollo missions, watching shuttle launches and gazing at the stars. For me I cannot understand how you cannot be interested in space. My degree is in astrophysics, but I decided I wanted to tell stories about space as that’s where my skills lie.

I worked as a Journalist, Weather Presenter and later Science Correspondent for the BBC, before venturing back to space in my current role. The official title of what I do now, is Space Journalist, Broadcaster and Author. This means I wear many hats, writing about space, working on screen on various TV channels talking about space and also travelling the globe giving talks about why space exploration matters.

Sarah Cruddas with her second book, 'Did you know? Space!'

Sarah Cruddas with her second book, ‘Did you know? Space!’

Congratulations on the publication of your children’s book ‘Find Out! Solar System’ [Solar System (DKfindout!)] and the upcoming second book Did You Know? Space: Amazing Answers to More than 200 Awesome Questions! How were you inspired to write the books?

I have always wanted to write books about space, but about a years ago Dorling Kindersley approached me to write a kids book. That book did really well and featured the likes of Alan Stern, the man behind the New Horizons mission to Pluto and Piers Sellers – if you haven’t heard of him, look him up and be inspired! I was then asked to write a second book, which is released in September 2017 and now I have a lovely agent and am working on some very exciting book projects, which I can’t talk about just yet.

But the goal is to inspire people about space and why it all really matters.

We have to remember that to date fewer than 600 people have been to space. 600 on a planet of 7 billion.

In your opinion, what are the main challenges that human spaceflight faces in the near future?
Great question. There are many challenges. Not least of which, what will happen next after the ISS.

We have to remember that to date fewer than 600 people have been to space. 600 on a planet of 7 billion. One of the biggest challenges is cost. It is still hugely expensive to travel into space. That makes space less accessible. We are seeing private companies such as Blue Origin and SpaceX work to develop rocket reusability. This will help to reduce the cost of going to space.

But money isn’t the only issue. There is the impact on physical and mental health for astronauts, as we look towards missions to Mars we need to know more about how the body can survive in zero gravity for a long amount of time. As well as the impact psychologically of being in confinement on a long duration mission. There are also issues such as food and water, even clothing for longer duration space missions. However, there are a lot of smart people working the problem. Just because it seems impossible now, doesn’t mean it will always be that way.

Who were your role models when you were growing up? How important are role models to young girls?

I had so many role models when I was growing up. I was a child in the 1990s, but I read so much about Apollo, that I was completely inspired by the astronauts. Gus Grissom and Pete Conrad were always my favorites. They might not have been as well known, but both played a huge part in getting America to the Moon. Also female astronauts such as Judith Resnik and Rhea Seddon were a huge inspiration to me. I think role models are important for anyone growing up. They inspire you to strive to be the best you can be.

Sarah Cruddas, Space Broadcaster & Author

Sarah Cruddas, Space Broadcaster & Author

I left a steady job at the BBC to follow my dreams for space. I think taking risk is a good thing and you never know what is going to happen on the way. I have worked with astronauts and billionaires and have met some of the most powerful people in the world.

What else did you want to be when you were growing up?

I wanted to be an astronaut. I still do. I was convinced I would be on the first crewed mission to Mars, but I think the timing is wrong with that one. One thing for sure it that I don’t think you should ever count yourself out – I learned that from working with Gene Cernan, the last person to walk on the Moon, so who knows what the future holds!

I like to follow Jeff Bezos’ moto of ‘regret minimization’ when thinking about my next step. But don’t get me wrong it’s hard to forge your own path and go against the norm, but that’s also the excitement!

What are your favourite things about your job?

That it has enabled me to take risks in my life. I left a steady job at the BBC to follow my dreams for space. I think taking risk is a good thing and you never know what is going to happen on the way. I have worked with astronauts and billionaires and have met some of the most powerful people in the world. I have also been to the Congo, North Korea and Tibet (to name but a few) and have seen the diversity and often unfair balance on our own planet.

I like to follow Jeff Bezos’ moto of ‘regret minimization’ when thinking about my next step. But don’t get me wrong it’s hard to forge your own path and go against the norm, but that’s also the excitement!

How do you think the space industry has changed for women over the years? Has it become more inclusive?

I think the Space Industry is making some hugely positive strides. Of course there is still more to be done, but it is getting there.

Of course I have things I wish I had done differently, I have highs and lows just like the next person. But my number one piece of advice would be not to worry. I am a terrible worrier. Yet things always seem to work out, even when you don’t think they will. Something will just come along and surprise you.

If you had one piece of advice for your 10-year-old self, what would it be? Would there be any decisions that you’d have made differently?

That’s an interesting question. Of course I have things I wish I had done differently, I have highs and lows just like the next person. But my number one piece of advice would be not to worry. I am a terrible worrier. Yet things always seem to work out, even when you don’t think they will. Something will just come along and surprise you. That is the beauty of life!