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Inspirational women, Meet A Rocket Woman

Meet The NASA Rocket Women That Kept The Space Station Flying During Hurricane Harvey: Part 2

8 September, 2017

Jessica Tramaglini on-console in NASA's Mission Control Center [Copyright: NASA, Photographer: Bill Stafford]

Jessica Tramaglini on-console in NASA’s Mission Control Center [Copyright: NASA, Photographer: Bill Stafford]

In a special four-part feature, Rocket Women are highlighting the untold stories of the dedicated Orbit1 team that remained in Mission Control at NASA Johnson Space Center to tirelessly battle Hurricane Harvey, keeping the space station flying and the astronauts onboard safe.

These resilient individuals slept in Mission Control for days through the hurricane, maintaining communication and support from the ground to the space station and it’s occupants.

The second interview in this series features Jessica Tramaglini. Jessica’s role is to manage the International Space Station’s Power and External Thermal Control or ‘SPARTAN’ in NASA’s Mission Control Center.

What was the path to get to where you are now? How were you inspired to consider a career in the space industry?

We have such a diverse group of people who work in Mission Control in Houston who come from a variety of backgrounds. I personally attended college to study aerospace engineering, receiving a B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from Penn State University and then started working here. I grew up inspired by space, and knew I wanted to work in Mission Control after attending Space Camp at 12 years-old.

I grew up inspired by space, and knew I wanted to work in Mission Control after attending Space Camp at 12 years-old.

What does your average day look like in your role?

One of the best parts about my role is that there is really no ‘average’ day. Each day brings new and exciting challenges, such as training new flight controllers, working with other groups to update procedures and flight rules, and of course, working console.

Our goal on-console [in Mission Control] was just to keep the crew safe and the vehicle [International Space Station] working

Jessica Tramaglini on-console in Mission control supporting Expedition 45, during prelaunch and launch of Expedition 45/Visiting Crew (Cosmonaut Sergey Volkov, European Space Agency Astronaut Andreas Mogensen & Cosmonaut Aidyn Aimbetov) launching on Soyuz TMA-18M from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan  [Copyright: NASA, Photographer: James Blair]

Jessica Tramaglini on-console in Mission control supporting
Expedition 45, during prelaunch and launch of Expedition 45/Visiting Crew (Cosmonaut Sergey Volkov, European Space Agency Astronaut Andreas Mogensen & Cosmonaut Aidyn Aimbetov) launching on Soyuz TMA-18M from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan
[Copyright: NASA, Photographer: James Blair]

Describe your experience of being on-console during Hurricane Harvey?

Our goal on console was just to keep the crew safe and the vehicle working, minimizing any complicated tasks that could be postponed. The amount of support we received from each other and from people outside checking in on us was amazing.

What was the hardest part of maintaining ISS operations from Mission Control in Houston during Hurricane Harvey?

Especially working the overnight shift where I had to try to sleep during the day, staying in touch with family to let them know I was safe, and keeping in touch with friends who were experiencing flooding was difficult. Once you sat down to console for your shift, you had to block all of that out and focus on the job.

Has this experienced changed you from a professional or personal perspective?

This experience has just reinforced what a special group of people I have the honor of working with. They are incredibly supportive, organized, and everyone steps up to help when they are able.

What has been the most rewarding moment in your career so far?

I really can’t pick one single moment, but watching flight controllers you have trained succeed, and working console for Soyuz undockings are extremely rewarding opportunities that I’ve been fortunate enough to experience.

If you want something, set your mind to it, and go for it.

If you had one piece of advice for your 10-year-old self, what would it be?

If you want something, set your mind to it, and go for it. Goals can’t be achieved without taking a risk. You may stumble along the way, but learn from your experiences and keep your eye on the prize.

Inspirational women, Meet A Rocket Woman

Meet The Rocket Women In Mission Control That Kept The Space Station Flying During Hurricane Harvey

3 September, 2017

The Orbit1 Flight Control Team: Dorothy Ruiz, Natalie Gogins, Fiona Turett, Jessica Tramaglini [Source: Twitter https://twitter.com/DorothyRuiz/status/903259274004099072]

The Orbit1 Flight Control Team: Dorothy Ruiz, Natalie Gogins, Fiona Turett, Jessica Tramaglini [Source: Twitter https://twitter.com/DorothyRuiz/status/903259274004099072]

As the devastating effects of Hurricane Harvey unfolded in Houston, a dedicated team in Mission Control at NASA Johnson Space Center battled the storm to tirelessly ensure that International Space Station operations continued and that the astronauts onboard the space station remained safe. These amazing individuals showed resilience by literally sleeping in Mission Control for days throughout the storm, ensuring that communications from the ground to the space station remained online. The Orbit1 team (one team of three) pictured consisted of Dorothy Ruiz, Natalie Gogins, Fiona Turett, Jessica Tramaglini and Flight Director Anthony Vareha.

Rocket Women was fortunate to talk to these amazing individuals about the challenges they faced to keep Mission Control online. The first interview in a series featuring the resilient Orbit1 team highlights Dorothy Ruiz, Ground Control, whose cruicial role it is to keep Mission Control connected to the International Space Station through satellite communications. Dorothy’s story is particularly inspiring. She chased her dream to work in space, coming from a family of migrant workers, overcoming obstacles that took her from a small town in the desert to Mission Control at NASA Johnson Space Center.

What was the path to get to where you are now? How were you inspired to consider a career in the space industry? 

I grew up with my Grandparents in central Mexico in a small town of Matehuala, located in the desert of state of San Luis Potosí.  At that time, the town had about 140,000 habitants. Almost every night, I would admire the stars in the sky from the roof of my Grandparent’s house.  We were a family of migrant workers, so we would travel to the U.S. every summer to work on the fields of North America.

Every night, I would admire the stars in the sky from the roof of my Grandparent’s house.  We were a family of migrant workers, so we would travel to the U.S. every summer to work on the fields of North America.

One day, someone came to speak to us about space at the school for kids of migrant workers, and even though I didn’t understand much of what was going on due to the language barrier, I did get to see some space objects. Even though this was a limited exposure to what NASA was all about, I became more curious and intrigued about space.

Working in the fields, there was not much hope for ever launching a career in space, or any career at all.  My Grandma only went to 3rd grade, and Grandpa was only able to finish elementary school.

Working in the fields, there was not much hope for ever launching a career in space, or any career at all.  My Grandma only went to 3rd grade, and Grandpa was only able to finish elementary school. So the outlook for me as far as reaching a higher education, was not that great. However, there was an event that changed my destiny in 1986: the Space Shuttle Challenger accident. I was standing in front of the TV watching the replayed images of the failed ascent and the explosion.  I had many questions in my mind, such as how does the space shuttle work, how does it take men to space, why did it explode?

Back in my hometown, I didn’t have many answers to my questions from the people who surrounded me; this became a personal quest to search for these answers. I was determined to one day, pursue a career in space exploration.  My interest in math and science deepened in school. I finished 9th grade in Mexico, and moved to Houston.  I started at McArthur High School, and graduated from Humble High School with honors. I was offered scholarships at the University of Oklahoma and started pursuing a degree in Aerospace Engineering, however, the school of Aerospace Engineering was canceled due to lack of interest and funding (there were only 20 men enrolled, and only 1 girl, me).

I landed my first job at NASA as an Astronaut Instructor for the Guidance Control and Propulsion Systems of the Space Shuttle. As I certified in my first lesson as an Instructor, I realized, I had already found the answers to all the questions I had as a little girl.  It was the closing chapter of a journey of curiosity and exploration.

We were given the choice to merge into Mechanical Engineering, or transfer to another school.  I transferred to Texas A&M University, and graduated with the class of 2003 with a Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering. During my college years, I was an intern with the NASA Langley Aerospace Scholars, and then I started a co-op rotation with United Space Alliance at Johnson Space Center.  The funny thing is, I landed my first job at NASA JSC as an Astronaut Instructor for the Guidance Control and Propulsion Systems of the Space Shuttle.  I am not sure if it was coincidence, but as I certified in my first lesson as an Instructor, I realized, I had already found the answers to all the questions I had as a little girl.  It was the closing chapter of a journey of curiosity and exploration.

We keep the ground connected to the International Space Station via satellite communications.

Dorothy Ruiz in Mission Control at NASA Johnson Space Center during Hurricane Harvey. (Copyright: Dorothy Ruiz. Source: https://twitter.com/DorothyRuiz/status/903259274004099072)

Dorothy Ruiz in Mission Control at NASA Johnson Space Center during Hurricane Harvey. [Copyright: Dorothy Ruiz. Source: https://twitter.com/DorothyRuiz/status/903259274004099072]

What does your average day look like in your role?

I am currently Ground Control, better known as Houston GC. We are the house keepers of the Mission Control Center (MCC), and we monitor the integrity of the signal communications processed between MCC Houston to White Sands, and to the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). Big picture, we keep the ground connected to the International Space Station via satellite communications.  We usually support console operations one week and one weekend per month, including shifts requiring extra support, such as space vehicle docking/undocking, space vehicle launches, and step-ups (we disconnect the ground from the International Space Station (ISS) for software upgrades).

Other routine tasks include: processing and routing all video and audio coming from the ISS, privatizing video and audio crew conferences, routing ISS telemetry to the rest of the flight controllers, routing data to our international partners, and supporting simulations. The rest of the time is spent in the office, working on projects, although to be honest, this is quite a luxury, GCs are hardly in the office, since we are so busy all the time.

Only essential personnel and Flight Controllers were riding out the storm in MCC supporting space operations, and most of us were camping out due to the heavy rains and the flooding. I decided to camp out since Sunday morning to start to sleep shift, so I brought pillows, covers, toiletries, extra clothes, and extra food.

Describe your experience of being on-console during Hurricane Harvey? 

I started to support Orbit1 console operations in Mission Control during Hurricane Harvey on Sunday night of August 27th. Only essential personnel and Flight Controllers were riding out the storm in MCC supporting space operations, and most of us were camping out due to the heavy rains and the flooding. I decided to camp out since Sunday morning to start to sleep shift, so I brought pillows, covers, toiletries, extra clothes, and extra food.

Prior to the hurricane, we were given access to the crew sleeping quarters in case we needed to sleep there, however, hardly anyone went there due to the heavy rain on JSC campus (the crew sleeping quarters are not nearby MCC). Instead, cots were placed all over MCC: Simulator rooms, other MCC control centers such as the Blue FCR and the White FCR, and ground control support areas for maintenance personnel and other controllers who support Houston GC.

I live close by, but it wasn’t safe to drive back home. I can say it was not the most comfortable thing to sleep in the cots, however, I was grateful to have a place to stay while others were not so fortunate.

Mine was in a GC backroom, where we schedule the satellite time in support of ISS operations, so I decided to make it my sleeping quarters for privacy. I live close by, but it wasn’t safe to drive back home. I can say it was not the most comfortable thing to sleep in the cots, however, I was grateful to have a place to stay while others were not so fortunate. I did get to go home once it stopped raining to freshen up, but I heard other Flight Controllers were using the showers in a building next to MCC. Some of my colleagues who support Ground operations didn’t get to go home at all because they live across town; it was too unsafe to navigate through flooded roads.

Other Flight Controllers were not relieved, because the Flight Controllers coming to support the shift, got stuck on the roads or their houses got flooded. So, you can imagine how tired everyone was.

Other Flight Controllers were not relieved, because the Flight Controllers coming to support the shift, got stuck on the roads or their houses got flooded. So, you can imagine how tired everyone was. Also, some etiquette rules were lifted for frozen foods in the refrigerators– all the frozen food there was fair game if someone didn’t have any food to eat. Is that considered looting? Ha, ha. Luckily, we had potable water all the time, backup electricity, internet, and the most important thing:  coffee!!!

During my down time, while I was not supporting console operations, I would check on my family by phone to make sure they were okay, provide statuses to friends and family members who were worried, catch up on work, do walkthroughs of MCC [Mission Control Center], check on our support personnel and, of course, watch the news over the internet.

It was hard to see how people were flooding out there, the rescue efforts, the stories; it was quite an emotional time to be there and not be able to go out to help others; there was this feeling of impotence.  However, we had a mission of our own to accomplish, and a darn big one: to keep MCC safe, and to keep supporting human spaceflight.

It was hard to see how people were flooding out there, the rescue efforts, the stories; it was quite an emotional time to be there and not be able to go out to help others; there was this feeling of impotence.  However, we had a mission of our own to accomplish, and a darn big one: to keep MCC safe, and to keep supporting human spaceflight. On the bright side of things, there was time for bonding between all of us, some stories to share, and an opportunity to know people through their personal stories. We also witnessed the generosity from others, who cooked meals in their houses, and brought the food to MCC so we could eat home-made meals and fruit. We saw messages of encouragement from Astronaut Peggy Whitson, and from kids in Chicago who sent us drawings thanking us for the time and sacrifice riding out the storm at MCC.

Dorothy Ruiz in her sleeping quarters during Hurricane Harvey, a Ground Control backroom, where satellite time is scheduled in support of ISS operations. [Copyright: Dorothy Ruiz. Source: https://twitter.com/DorothyRuiz/status/903259274004099072]

Dorothy Ruiz in her sleeping quarters during Hurricane Harvey, a Ground Control backroom, where satellite time is scheduled in support of ISS operations. [Copyright: Dorothy Ruiz. Source: https://twitter.com/DorothyRuiz/status/903259274004099072]

Did you volunteer to be on-console for the weekend or were contingency plans in place?

It just happened it was the week of the month for me to support graveyard shifts in MCC.  Oh lucky me!

The crew [onboard the ISS] was updated on a regular basis.  However, I don’t think they realized the Flight Control Team was riding out the storm –not until they somehow found out we were sleeping in cots.  That’s when we got a message from Peggy [NASA Astronaut Peggy Whitson].  Certainly, the message was encouraging to read.

What was the hardest part of maintaining ISS operations from MCC-H during Hurricane Harvey? Were the onboard crew given regular updates as to the situation in Houston?

The crew was updated on a regular basis. However, I don’t think they realized the Flight Control Team was riding out the storm –not until they somehow found out we were sleeping in cots. That’s when we got a message from Peggy. Certainly, the message was encouraging to read. As Houston-GC, the hardest part about this was making sure the MCC building was in good conditions. At some point, we had to keep track of all the leaks going on in MCC. This was a concern, because some of the leaks could affect our equipment processing the signal coming into MCC, or going out to the ISS for that matter.

We lost some power in MCC at some point, so the hallways were dark. We also had to improvise and plan-ahead in preparation for the Soyuz undocking, since we lost some of our video routing capabilities due to flooding in the building that processes video.

We had to make a list, and revise the list every few hours to provide update to Flight and the whole team.  We lost some power in MCC at some point, so the hallways were dark. We also had to improvise and plan-ahead in preparation for the Soyuz undocking, since we lost some of our video routing capabilities due to flooding in the building that processes video.

I must say, I feel proud of the Ground Control Team, such as the Network Communications Officer, the Communications Technicians, the Support Center, the Security Officer, the Johnson TV crew, and the maintenance personnel who were making round checks all over the building, vacuuming out water, reporting to us on the status of the building, and sleeping between breaks; these are the folk who didn’t get to go home.

I never heard them complain about anything, they were just proudly doing their jobs with much dedication despite the circumstances and despite being away from their loved ones. They are the real heroes of this story.

I never heard them complain about anything, they were just proudly doing their jobs with much dedication despite the circumstances and despite being away from their loved ones. They are the real heroes of this story. The maintenance personnel were making sure the MCC building was safe so we could do our jobs, along with the security guards at the JSC campus, and others who stayed to protect other facilities. These guys are the epitome of what ground control operations is all about: dedication and toughness, especially in tough times.

These guys are the epitome of what ground control operations is all about: dedication and toughness, especially in tough times.

Dorothy Ruiz's sleeping quarters at Mission Control during Hurricane Harvey, a Ground Control backroom where satellite time is usually scheduled [Copyright: Dorothy Ruiz. Source: https://twitter.com/DorothyRuiz/status/903259274004099072]

Dorothy Ruiz’s sleeping quarters at Mission Control during Hurricane Harvey, a Ground Control backroom where satellite time is usually scheduled [Copyright: Dorothy Ruiz. Source: https://twitter.com/DorothyRuiz/status/903259274004099072]

Did the MCC-H [Mission Control Center Houston] team consider to activate the Backup Advisory Team (BAT) [a way to remotely connect to Mission Control] or transfer operations to Hunstville [where the Backup Control Centre is based] during this period? 

It was considered at some point, but it was a difficult decision to make due to the uncertainty of the path of the hurricane.  In retrospect, no one could foresee the great impact of the hurricane in Houston, especially with the flooding. This has been a one in a lifetime event. However, part of the Backup Control Center (BCC) was activated due to damage to the building that processes the ISS video coming to MCC.  We configured some of our equipment in MCC so the video could be archived in Huntsville.

We are not just the House Keepers of MCC, but also a life boat.

Has this experienced changed you from a professional or personal perspective?

This experience has changed me in both ways. I appreciate even more the job we do as Ground Controllers, now I can really say, we are not just the House Keepers of MCC, but also a life boat. Those who underestimate the contributions of ground control operations as a team to manned space flight and space exploration should seek a different perspective, and take a closer look at what we do to keep MCC safe and operational so everyone can do their job.  We not only keep the ground connected to the ISS, we also keep it floating.

I would never imagine one day, I would be here sleeping in cots, making sure MCC is safe and Mission Operations are safe, to keep human spaceflight going.  This for sure will be a story to tell my grandkids one day, what a story.

Personally, I appreciate getting to know other colleagues while sharing the stories of strength and struggle during such turbulent days. I would never imagine one day, I would be here sleeping in cots, making sure MCC is safe and Mission Operations are safe, to keep human spaceflight going.  This for sure will be a story to tell my grandkids one day, what a story.

It is my personal quest to inspire those who like me, had life struggles growing up, and could never imagine becoming an Engineer or working at such a great place like NASA. However, with this recent experience, it is my hope, we inspire others with our work ethic:  Dedication, Toughness and Competence.  That’s what we embody, that’s who we are.

What has been the most rewarding moment in your career so far?

The most rewarding thing in my career has been to inspire others with all the work we do at NASA, and it is my personal quest to inspire those who like me, had life struggles growing up, and could never imagine becoming an Engineer or working at such a great place like NASA. However, with this recent experience, it is my hope, we inspire others with our work ethic:  Dedication, Toughness and Competence.  That’s what we embody, that’s who we are.

Astronauts, Inspirational women

Record-Breaking Rocket Woman NASA Astronaut Peggy Whitson Returns To Earth

3 September, 2017
NASA Astronaut Peggy Whitson During A Spacewalk or EVA (Extra-Vehicular Activity) (Source: NASA)

NASA Astronaut Peggy Whitson During A Spacewalk or EVA (Extra-Vehicular Activity) (Source: NASA)

Rocket Woman NASA Astronaut Peggy Whitson returned to Earth on Sunday 3rd September, after spending 288 days in space, or nearly 10 months – 4 months longer than most astronauts assigned to missions onboard the International Space Station. With today’s culmination of her third long-duration spaceflight, the biochemist has now spent a record breaking 665 days in space!

Peggy Whitson became the first female commander of the International Space Station (ISS) in 2008 and her cumulative time in space now makes her the most experienced NASA Astronaut ever, smashing NASA Astronaut Jeff Williams’ 534 day record and NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly’s 520 days in space. Only seven Russian men remain ahead of Peggy Whitson in the space experience stakes, with time onboard both the ISS & the Mir space station.

During her recent mission she additionally completed her 10th spacewalk, collating over 60 hours of spacewalk time, making her the third most experienced spacewalker ever (and surpassing Sunita Williams’ record as the most experienced female spacewalker). Two astronauts remain ahead of her: Russian Anatoly Solovyev and NASA’s Michael Lopez Alegria. Peggy Whitson is also the oldest woman to fly, at 57.

Peggy Whitson, her crewmate Jack Fisher along with any returning ISS science samples will travel to the European Space Agency’s European Astronaut Centre in Cologne from Kazakhstan for a stopover, before travelling directly to Houston on Sunday evening.

NASA Astronaut Peggy Whitson returning to Earth, after spending 288 days in space, or nearly 10 months (Source: Still image taken from NASA TV)

NASA Astronaut Peggy Whitson returning to Earth, after spending 288 days in space, or nearly 10 months (Source: Still image taken from NASA TV)

Peggy and her colleagues undocked their Soyuz MS-04 spacecraft at 5:58 pm EDT & landed in Kazakhstan at 9:22 pm EDT (7:22 a.m. 3rd Sept, Kazakhstan time). Watch Peggy’s return to Earth again at NASA TV. At Rocket Women we’re excited for Peggy’s return to Earth today!