Monthly Archives

November 2015

Media

Rocket Women Featured In Capioca’s Interview Series

28 November, 2015

I’m excited for Rocket Women to be featured in Capioca’s interview series. In the interview I discuss the importance of inspiring the next generation of women in STEM, designing spacesuits and the importance of role models to young girls making defining career decisions.

The full interview can be found here:

Capioca still

Inspiration

New Scholarships For Women In STEM

26 November, 2015

Scholarship VG

Dreaming of being a pilor? This could be you! [Virgin Galactic]

If you or someone you know are looking to study an undergraduate degree in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Maths) then there are 2 scholarships that you should consider!

Cards Against Humanity – Science Ambassador Scholarship

The popular card game Cards Against Humanity are funding a full tuition scholarship for a woman seeking an undergraduate degree in science, engineering or maths. To apply submit a 3 minute video here of your awesome self explaining a science topic that your passionate about. The review panel will be is refreshingly ‘a board of fifty women who hold higher degrees and work professionally in science and engineering’ according to the Science Ambassador website. Once through this round, 10 finalists will submit additional materials for a chance at winning the scholarship and receive full tuition coverage for up to four years. Uniquely the scholarship is being funded through purchases of the Cards Against Humanity expansion Science Pack with the current total raised of US$546,724 and counting! The deadline to apply is December 1st, 2015. Good luck!

Virgin Galactic – Galactic Unite Flying Tigresses Scholarship

Virgin Galactic are providing a one-time scholarship award of $2,200 to a collegiate or early-career woman establishing a career in aerospace with a belief that ‘aviation and being a pilot is key to her career and personal mission’. In addition to the scholarship, the award recipient will have access to mentoring opportunities and other Galactic Unite educational programs in partnership with Virgin Galactic.

The origins of the Galactic Unite Flying Tigresses Scholarship began through Anne Marie Radel and Margaret Viola’s participation as “Team Flying Tigresses” in the 2015 Air Race Classic. An amazing all-women’s transcontinental air race stemming from the 1929 Women’s Air Derby. These inspirational women flew with the intention of raising awareness and support for women in STEM careers, women pilots, and the emerging commercial space industry. The deadline for the scholarship is November 30th, 2015 and can be applied for here.

Inspirational women

Katherine Johnson Receives Presidential Medal of Freedom At 97

25 November, 2015
katherine obama

Katherine Johnson Receiving The Presidential Medal Of Freedom From President Obama

97-Year-Old Katherine Johnson played a role in every major US space program, from Alan Shepard’s inaugural flight to the Space Shuttle. Today she became a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the United States’ highest civilian honor, for a hugely influential career in mathematics.

Johnson’s inspirational work for the U.S. space program predates the creation of NASA. She began to work for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, or NACA in 1953 where women had been hired to calculate results, this in an era prior to the modern electronic computer. The job title of these women were “Computer.” Johnson’s computations on flight trajectories were used on Alan Shepard’s inaugural flight (First American in Space), John Glenn’s orbit of the earth and the 1969 Apollo 11 moon landing.

“I counted everything. I counted the steps to the road, the steps up to church, the number of dishes and silverware I washed … anything that could be counted, I did.” – Katherine Johnson

Katherine Johnson with NASA Administrator Charles Bolden

Katherine Johnson with NASA Administrator Charles Bolden

A newly released statement by Dava Newman, NASA’s Deputy Administrator encompasses the feelings of many women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics).

“The reach of Katherine Johnson’s leadership and impact extends from classrooms across America all the way to the moon. Katherine once remarked that while many of her colleagues refrained from asking questions or taking tasks further than merely ‘what they were told to do,’ she chose instead to ask questions because she ‘wanted to know why.’

“For Katherine, finding the ‘why’ meant enrolling in high school at the age of 10; calculating the trajectory of Alan Shepherd’s trip to space and the Apollo 11’s mission to the moon; and providing the foundation that will someday allow NASA to send our astronauts to Mars. She literally wrote the textbook on rocket science.

We are all so fortunate that Katherine insisted on asking questions, and insisted on relentlessly pursing the answers. We are fortunate that when faced with the adversity of racial and gender barriers, she found the courage to say ‘tell them I’m coming.’ We are also fortunate that Katherine has chosen to take a leading role in encouraging young people to pursue education in the STEM disciplines of science, technology, engineering, and math.

Katherine was born on National Equality Day. Few Americans have embodied the true spirit of equity as profoundly or impacted the cause of human exploration so extensively. At NASA, we are proud to stand on Katherine Johnson’s shoulders.”

Astronauts

All-Female Russian Crew Start Mock Mission To The Moon

2 November, 2015
The crew of 6 Russian women prior to entering isolation

The Crew Of 6 Russian Women Prior To Entering Isolation

A year after Russia sent it’s first female cosmonaut to the International Space Station (ISS), a group of six Russian women are currently undergoing an 8-day analogue mission to the Moon. The accomplished women, with expertise in backgrounds including biophysics and medicine, entered a suite of wood-panelled rooms on October 28 at Moscow’s Institute of Biomedical Problems to simulate the mission. The psychological effects of spaceflight are being tested, with a team of doctors and psychologists remotely monitoring the study.

The institute has previously undertaken a 520 day isolation mock mission, Mars 500, in which 6 male candidates lived in similar conditions, simulating a mission to Mars. Another older analogue study with a mixed crew ended early after two male crewmembers fought and one male crewmember attempted to kiss a female crewmember.

One of the most challenging parts of the all-female Russian mock mission may have occurred before it had even started, during the pre-study press conference. The institute’s director Igor Ushakov remarked, “We believe women might not only be no worse than men at performing certain tasks in space, but actually better.” His casual derogatory remarks continued with, “I’d like to wish you a lack of conflicts, even though they say that in one kitchen, two housewives find it hard to live together.” A potentially inspiring endeavour for women in space was unfortunately reduced to a sterotypical comparison of being a housewife and not being good enough for spaceflight. His remarks deepening the fact that a lack of self-confidence in one’s ability is an internal barrier that women battle around the world. When Canadian Space Agency (CSA) retired astronaut Dr.Julie Payette was asked what her biggest challenge in the pursuit of her goals, she admitted that it was “Fear and doubt I wouldn’t perform as needed.”  Dr.Payette admitted that it had been her biggest challenge and it had taken a lengthy amount of time to convince herself that she was good for the job, even once she was selected and in training.

The institute director’s remarks continued to set the tone for the press conference, where the 6 women, all experts in their fields, were asked by the press how they would cope without men or makeup for the next week. When the subject being inquired into moved to how they could possibly cope for 8 days without shampoo, the women sarcastically remarked back to the press, “I don’t know how we’ll survive without shampoo. Because even in this situation, we really want to stay looking pretty.”  The media’s line of questioning is similar to that faced recently by cosmonaut Yelena Serova, Russia’s 4th cosmonaut(!) and the first female cosmonaut on the ISS. Yelena, an engineer with significant experience, was asked prior to her mission how she would style her hair in the microgravity conditions on the ISS and how she would continue to bond with her daughter during her 6-month mission. The then head of Russia’s space agency’s remarks about Yelena’s mission of, “We are doing this flight for Russia’s image. She will manage it, but the next woman won’t fly out soon.”, do little to inspire hope in the numbers of Russian women in space increasing in the near future. Though by choosing to conduct a study with 6 female candidates simulating a mission to the Moon, Russia will gain additional results that may help with this issue and hopefully inspire young Russian girls to realise that they can be a cosmonaut too.